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New Mexico vesicular stomatitis cases stand at 23

A horse with excessive salivation, a sign of vesicular stomatitis.

A horse with excessive salivation, a sign of vesicular stomatitis.

Twenty-three cases of vesicular stomatitis have been confirmed in New Mexico, authorities report in their latest update.

The latest report from the Mexico Livestock Board on July 25 said there were confirmed cases in counties including Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Socorro, Valencia and Lincoln.

The board said the outbreak of the contagious disease, which can affect livestock and horses, continues to be significant.

Symptoms can be similar to those of foot and mouth disease.

It said the most recent positive cases have just been confirmed in Rio Arriba and Socorro counties, and that investigations continue in counties outside the Rio Grande Valley.

More than 20 premises were under quarantine.

Horses with vesicular stomatitis show blanched raised or broken vesicles of various sizes in the mouth.

Horses with vesicular stomatitis show blanched raised or broken vesicles around the upper surface of the tongue, surface of the lips and around nostrils, corners of the mouth and the gums.

The board urged continued vigilance by horse owners.

Clinical signs of the disease include:

  • Excessive salivation,
  • Blanched, raised or broken vesicles of various sizes in the mouth. In horses, this affects the  upper surface of the tongue, surface of the lips and around nostrils, corners of the mouth and the gums.
  • Lesions involving feet of horses and cattle are not normally exceptional.

The board offered the following measures to protect vulnerable species, including cattle and pigs:

  • Avoid commingling with animals that have not been examined.
  • Use insect repellant products (sprays, eartags etc.), fly sheets and other measures to keep biting insects off stock.
  • Take steps to control or eliminate sites where biting insects such as flies or mosquitoes might multiply.
  • Do not share feeding and watering equipment, cleaning tools, or health care equipment
  • Check animals daily for signs and lesions suggesting the presence of VS, and report any suspicious lesions to your veterinarian or to the State Veterinarian’s Office immediately.
  • Avoid travel to areas of the state where active cases are documented or to areas considered higher risk for the emergence of cases.
  • Check the website, www.nmlbonline.com frequently for important information and updates.
  • Always contact states of destination when traveling from New Mexico.
  • Remain diligent and take the risks of exposure and comingling seriously.
Map showing cases of VS in New Mexico.

Map showing cases of VS in New Mexico.

 

 

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Comments (1)

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  1. Ntvhrt says:

    Can they track this to where it began?

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